Copyright: Aska, Brooklyn
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Capital One didn’t just “enter” the dining world in recent years with things like exclusive tables at top restaurants — they went directly to the top, with major Michelin Guide partnerships – and the James Beard Foundation too.

You care, because the Michelin Guide partnership is creating exclusive opportunities to try the creme de la creme of the restaurant world, with access money can’t buy, as well as pop up dinners even cooler than any standard restaurant fare.

A few of the most acclaimed restaurants and chefs in the USA are offering special one off dinners which wine pairings, access to the chef and “gifts”, all with an international twist, but to get in, you’ll need to move fast.

They’re not cheap, but this level of dining rarely is.

With international travel recovering slowly and many of the most sought after places in Asia still relatively closed, being able to enjoy an ‘Asia’ themed dinner in New York with some of the world’s greatest chefs at the helm, or a special European themed dinner in Washington DC, or perhaps a Latin American themed dinner in San Francisco is pretty cool.

Copyright: Aska, Brooklyn

Capital One’s New ‘Destination’ Dining Series

Capital One and the Michelin Guide are offering seriously cool dining opportunities in New York, San Francisco and Washington DC, with some of the hottest Michelin star chefs.

Capital One cardholders have exclusive access to these events, and tickets are $450 per person. It sounds steep, but three Michelin starred dining is supposed to offer a level of excitement in line with a big tiem pro sporting event, evening at the theatre or a major concert.

Plus, tasting menu dinners with wine pairings at any of these establishments would probably fetch far more, without the extras which Capital One and the Michelin Guide are bringing.

Here’s how Capital One describes the ‘Destination’ dinner series (ticket link).

Destination: Europe in Washington, D.C.

On Thursday, December 2 and Friday, December 3

Hosted at Chef Ryan Ratino’s Bresca, this dinner will take guests on a culinary European adventure, teaming up Chef Ratino, Chef Danny Lledó of DC’s Xiquet and Chef Suzette Gresham of San Francisco’s Acquerello

Destination: Asia in New York City

On Thursday, January 27 and Friday, January 28 

Hosted at Chef David Kim’s COTE, this dinner will transport guests with a menu created by Chef Kim, Chef Nozomu Abe of Sushi Noz and Chef Minh Phan of Los Angeles’ Phenakite.

Destination: Latin America in San Francisco

On Thursday, February 3, Friday, February 4 and Saturday, February 5

Hosted at Chef Val Cantu’s Californios, this dinner will be inspired by some of Latin America’s most celebrated culinary destinations, all created by Chef Cantu, Chef Jordan Rosas of Barndiva and Chef Juan Manuel Barrientos of DC’s Elcielo

Tickets to these intimate events are $450 per person and include a one-of-a-kind tasting menu, beverage pairing and special gift. All food and beverage, service and tax, is included in the ticket price.

As one might expect, tickets are exclusively available for Capital One credit and debit card holders.

There’s a 100,000 point bonus on Capital One Venture X right now.

If this is up your street, these dining events typically sell out in a day, based on prior experience. For many, it might be worth using points or a great deal to actually fly in for the night, just to take advantage. I actually might, for the NYC dinner.

With Capital One’s recent addition of the Venture X premium credit card, I can’t help but think that Capital One will be launching more and more access, special tables and unique dining experiences, now that it’s entered the premium card market. If these sell out dinners are any indication, the appetite is strong!

You can check out tickets (while they last) here.

Gilbert Ott

Gilbert Ott is an ever curious traveler and one of the world's leading travel experts. His adventures take him all over the globe, often spanning over 200,000 miles a year and his travel exploits are regularly...

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3 Comments

  1. Most of your posts contain interesting and fun travel adventures. I have availed myself of some way cool trips, stays and eats. Coming out of this pandemic and huge social unrest, I was hoping for some insight on the safety of some of the cities you advocate. In the past, San Francisco, New York, Seattle and others have been great cultural experiences. Today retired and 70 yrs old, you could not pay me to visit these unsafe destinations. Or am I totally off base? Although a Midwesterner, I’ve lived in a wide variety of environments i.e. MPLS, Denver, Alaska and South Africa. Some perspective on the real risks of modern American cities would be appreciated. The perspective might help me decide where to burn all these points you’ve taught me to acquire. Thank you.

    1. Hey Theodore, I primarily spend my time in New York and London, so I can speak from relatively good current experience. I’m loving seeing these cities come back to life, in many ways better. New York has ceded some parking over to restaurants for at least another year, so outdoor dining in the city is nicer than any point in history. London is experiencing at least some of the same. I walk more, whereas I might historically have taken the train, but I don’t worry for my health. I’m vaccinated, test regularly for peace of mind and try to avoid things I deem at risk, for now. Hope that helps! I’d say, choosing between these options, Quince and The Inn are both relatively outside the city, and in more rural outdoor settings.

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