No, it’s not nearly as big as Central Park, but Little Island, New York City’s latest park, is a must see.

Opened along New York’s west side, and literally floating on the Hudson River, the park brings a series of new cultural opportunities to the city, and also just a fantastic place to take the city in, in all its glory.

As travel to New York rebounds, the park, which opened on May 20th should provide a fresh look even for the most seasoned visitors, and is already proving popular with city residents.

Little Island NYC

Funded largely in part by Barry Diller and Diane von Furstenburg, Little Island is a $260m gem, blending nature, art and the future. It’s got an amphitheater, walking paths, free public art performances, food and much more.

Components of the park, nestled among more than 350 species of flowers, trees and shrubs, include a 687-seat amphitheater (“The Amph”), a central plaza with seating and serving food and beverages (“The Play Ground”), an intimate stage and lawn space (“The Glade”), and dazzling views of the park, New York City, and the Hudson River. Little Island was designed by Thomas Heatherwick of Heatherwick Studio, with landscape design by Signe Nielsen of MNLA.

Little Island

The “little” island still manages to feature hills and vantage points which offer wowing views of the New York City skyline, while showcasing the best of nature in one of the world’s most urban settings.

It’s like a mini version of Gardens by The Bay in Singapore sans futuristic light towers, just with more art space and quite a lot going on. And yes, the food stalls serve wine, beers and spirits to toast the vibes.

For now, tickets are available online for timed entry, ahead of an expected date when the park may allow wider entry. All tickets are complimentary. Little Island’s main entrance is located at West 13th Street and the Hudson River, at Pier 55.

Gilbert Ott

Gilbert Ott is an ever curious traveler and one of the world's leading travel experts. His adventures take him all over the globe, often spanning over 200,000 miles a year and his travel exploits are regularly...

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