Will you be refunded?

Primera Air spent 2018 rapidly expanding, launching long haul super low cost flights between Europe and the USA and eyeing up even more. The airline recently made headlines with $63 tickets from the US to London, but today, it’s all moot. Primera Air has ceased operations as of today, leaving travelers scrambling. The company will enter administration and its doors are already effectively closed. This leaves people with future Primera Air bookings with two simple questions. Will they get their money back? And how will they get home? Primera Air Refunds: When And Where

Whether your flight will be refunded or not has a lot to do with who you booked with and where. In the United Kingdom, where many of Primera Air’s USA flights took off, you should be eligible for refund if you paid the airline or a travel agent by credit card and paid more than Β£100, or took out travel insurance. If you booked via a travel agent, contact your travel agent for a refund. If you paid via debit card, and not credit card, your options for getting a refund are far more limited and less likely. Here’s a lot more fine print on the subject.

Primera Air Refunds For U.S. Travelers

For U.S. based travelers, perhaps those who booked some of the $63 one way flights, your best bet is to initiate a “charge back” with your bank and credit card company. A charge back is where you dispute the charge by calling the number on the back of your credit card. Simply say that you paid for a service and did not receive said service and won’t be. There’s no 100% guarantee the bank will uphold your charge back, but you have every right to initiate one – and any good bank should honor it.

Primera Air Booking Help

Primera Air won’t be taking calls, endorsing tickets or anything else. If you’re stranded, you’re very sadly on your own – unless you booked via a real travel agent or leading online travel agent. If you didn’t book with one of these, and booked directly with the airline, your best bet is to see if your credit card covers any delay protections, or includes any other travel insurance coverage. If it does, go that route. If it doesn’t, you’ll need to find your own way home, or book new tickets to your destination out of pocket. We wish there was better news.