Stress free travel is the best travel. Seamlessly transferring a passenger's bags to their next flight, even if it's on a different partner airline and making sure they're covered if they miss a connection seems fair and nice to me. In an unfortunate foray into one of the most passenger unfriendly changes, the OneWorld Alliance, namely American, British Airways, Cathay Pacific, Japan Airlines, Iberia and more, no longer have you covered if you booked separate tickets, even on the same airline...

If You Travel On Two Separate Tickets, You NO Longer...

Effective immediately, you're no longer covered if you miss a connection on a separate ticket, and neither are your bags, meaning even if you're on time, you'll have to re check in and go through security again in most cases. If weather, equipment or anything causes part of one ticket to screw up your other ticket, you're at their mercy and no, they won't help you with your bags even if you make the flight. Essentially, if for any reason such as using miles, or booking a trip within a trip, you end up in a pinch, you're no longer covered at no cost, even if the travel is all on one airline...

If You're On One Ticket, It's Business As Usual...

For many people a journey is as simple as a one round trip ticket. If that's all your trip involves then you're still covered and your bags will still be transferred. In the modern travel world, that's not the case for many. For points and miles enthusiasts, those who like to add little mini breaks within a bigger trip and any other situation such as booking separate one way tickets, you're out of luck. 

Why Are Airlines Doing This?

Airlines love and hate blogs like ours and the many others which are invaluable free resources to travelers. They love when we post their flash sales, help illustrate why buying points can be savvy and things like that, but they hate when we open your mind to booking trips within trips, adding stopovers, using miles one way and paying the other way and things that decrease their bottom line or allow us to avoid the more expensive fares. This is an attempt to make us fall into rank and file, and book the most traditional and generally (more expensive) tickets, while simultaneously making a cash grab, extracting extra money from those who still need to travel after missing a flight. Peace of mind is gone.

What If This Happens To Me?

Here's a perfect example: I am flying from Boston to New York on a cash paid ticket and connecting onto a great deal from New York to London. The New York to Boston ticket is on American and the New York to London ticket is on British Airways. They are partners, and in the past, no matter what, my bags would be checked through to British Airways and I would get a boarding pass for my British Airways flight, allowing me to bypass going through security again. Additionally, if I missed my flight to London, British Airways would help, without charge. NOW, you'll need to re clear security, re check your bags, get a new boarding pass and if anything goes wrong, you're at the airline's mercy, which for many, is bad news. If this happens to you, cite the old policy, be polite, ask for human sympathy and hope that someone has a heart. Airlines can over deliver, especially if they see it's in their best future interest...