Don't tell me you've never set foot on an airplane, looked at the seats and thought that you could come up with a better solution. I know you have, who couldn't? The thing is, we've dreamed up many of the best ways to use horizontal space, leaving only one way to go. And yes, in case you hadn't arrived there yet, that means vertical. While we're at it, why not put business and first class in the same cabin?.

Despite the psychological inferences of first class passengers literally being above business class, that's exactly how this design aims to utilize space, with two business class passengers on each end, utilizing the space below the reclined suite, which is slightly raised.

If that sounds a bit insane, this rendering paints a clearer picture, where you can clearly see two business class seats at the top of the image for every one first class suite in center focus. The first suite is raised and the business seats are lower, allowing them to use the space below the suite for foot room, entertainment screens and other storage. 

Look more like college than first class? I can't fault you. Rather than "waste" precious rows of the plane with separate first and business class cabins, this concept from Formation Design merges the two, requiring fewer rows, with far more rows left over to max out premium and economy. I'm not saying it's good news for us, but it's very clever. I suppose passengers will just close their eyes as different champagne and dinner is served to their lofty neighbors?

If you're traveling with a companion, you can even roll the window (privacy screen) in the middle two suites down, to say "how YOU doing"....

Of course if you don't want someone leaning over, winking and saying "how YOUUU doin", you can leave the divider raised, creating an environment much like Emirates, Singapore etc...

You could always just grab a single window seat, which takes all the thought process out of it, allowing you to take in the wonders of the sky, and tarmac.

The question becomes what to make of the business class seats, designed for eight across on wider aircraft, such as the Boeing 777 and A380. With four across, direct aisle access and personal space being the trend, this goes directly against the grain. Perhaps a lower price point would do the trick?

Despite being eight across, there appears to be a fair amount of privacy between the sets of two business class seats, with angled foot areas facing away from each other, the seats could easily resemble many of todays best seats minus the aisle access of course...

I know which seat I'd like...