BREXIT happened. That means however you felt yesterday, we're now faced with uncertainty and likely, down the road, change. There's plenty of mostly incorrect opinion and presumption out there, so we figured it would be worth a stab at how BREXIT will actually affect travel, not what it might do in years to come...

Most Of The Immediate Effects Will Only Be Felt By Britons... 

The worst immediate BREXIT effect is that the sinking British Pound will keep many budget travelers from being able to travel at all. For everyone else planning to go ahead with their travel, anything Britons hoped to purchase abroad like that nicer hotel, dinner, tipple, cup of coffee or hot dog may further from reach if the pound continues to struggle. Basically, more budgeting, less bang for your buck (pound). For the rest of the world, Britain is relatively on sale. Hotel prices are likely to drop, exchange rates are better and that's about it. 

Immigration + Air Travel Is Business As Usual. Nothing Has Changed...

The United Kingdom was never part of the Schengen Zone and there was never passport free travel to or from the UK to anywhere in the world. On that basis, it's business as usual for all immigration related to air travel. If you travel to anywhere outside of the UK, you need a passport. If you travel to the UK, you need a passport.  For tourists, visitors and just about everyone visiting or leaving the country, nothing changes. For foreign nationals working in the UK, still nothing changes, at least for now. Just show up on time, go through security and enjoy your flight...

British Travel Will Drop, But Just A Bit...

Yep, again, holidays may be just too marginally expensive for some while the British Pound battles it's way back up. According to surveys, roughly 10% of travelers worldwide will now seek other destinations in the wake of BREXIT, which signals an important marginal decline in overall tourism. On the other hand, with a better exchange rate for most non Brit's it could be an attractive time to explore while the currency is relatively weak. The problem is public perception. If people perceive that it's harder to enter the UK for tourism because of false information, they are less likely to visit. 

Airfare Prices, Credit Card Benefits, The Maybe...

We do not know what will happen to airfare. No one does, and if they say they do, they're lying. The Open Skies agreement which allows seamless, one zone travel throughout the EU may change, the UK may ratify a new identical agreement, NO ONE knows. For at least two years carriers will operate with no difference to operations today. Easy Jet, Ryanair, Norwegian and the budget carriers which have created amazing fares will still be there tomorrow. If demand drops, fares could rise but that's if and only if demand for UK travel drops. On another travel note, this could be a unique opportunity for the UK to increase credit card benefits, as it's possible they could move away from EU limitations on credit card interchange fees. This COULD mean more benefits and perks for UK credit card holders...