In the city of blinding lights, you’ll find everything you’re looking for. It’s the city dreams are made of, where there’s nothing you can’t do. That’s probably why they named it twice. And yes, we totally just ripped off two famous songs to draw you in here. Whether you’re looking for falafel trucks at 4AM or the Frick collection at 4PM, we’ve got you covered with this easy guide to maximizing your time in the city, getting around and enjoying some of the very best spots…

Getting There

NYC is one of the easiest cities to reach, whatever the means of transportation. With direct trains from most East Coast cities to Pennsylvania Station and no fewer than three easy major airports including LaGuardia for domestic flights as well as Kennedy and Newark for international arrivals, you’ve got options. Newark offers perhaps the quickest route into lower Manhattan, while John F. Kennedy Airport offers excellent connectivity to midtown and Brooklyn. Here’s a guide to riding the AirTrain from JFK, which is often the quickest and most cost efficient solution. Once in the city, Uber, Lyft, Subways and busses are everywhere.

Where To Stay

As you may have guessed, there’s no shortage of hotel or Airbnb options in New York City. If convenience is key, midtown offers plenty of palatable options which can easily connect you further up or downtown, such as the Kimpton EventiHotel Giraffe or Andaz Fifth. For amazing city views and a perfect location in the buzzing West Village, The Standard is tough to beat, as is the High Line Hotel. If you’re thinking Central Park walks, art galleries and upscale Upper East or Upper West Side dining, the Mandarin Oriental is about as sophisticated as it gets, while the lovely Hotel Elysee offers a more affordable take. If you’re looking for something less traditional, Williamsburg offers hip takes with cool skyline views from the McCarren Hotel, Wythe and William Vale.

Breakfast

It may not be unique to New York, but breakfast at a Laduree’s Soho cafe is a classic, even amongst New Yorkers. If you’re looking for a quicker bite, perhaps one with some pastry on the go, Maison Kayser is a favorite, with multiple locations throughout the city. For breakfasts fit for an Instagram star (the food, not you) Dominique Ansel offers an extraordinary range of sinfully good pastries, cakes and other treats at their downtown spot. If there’s a celebration or you feel like grazing for a boozy, indulgent brunch: Narcissa, Baar Baar, Buttermilk Channel and Buvette are classics. If you’re feeling adventurous and love a bit of Sunday gospel, Red Rooster by Marcus Samuelsson is an experience you’ll never forget, and a great excuse to see the renaissance of Harlem. For good coffee: Stumptown Coffee Roasters, The ElkSouthern Cross or Black Fox will hit all the right perky notes.

Sightseeing Basics

If it’s your first time in New York, we’ll excuse a brief sunrise or sunset visit to Times Square. But after that, you must leave. There are no New Yorkers, or real New York pizza’s to be seen there, nor will there ever be, despite what you’ve heard. It’s only ok to visit this area if you’re going to the theatre, once you’ve seen it.If you need to get the obligatory skyline photo, be sure to go to Top Of The Rock at Rockefeller Center, rather than the Empire State Building. Why? Because you’ll actually have the landmark in your photo! Now that those things are out of the way, it’s important to remember how easy it is to get around NYC by subway, so don’t fret if you find yourself hopping back and forth and if you’ve got the time – just walk. The subway is intuitive though, we promise. Uptown trains will take you to street numbers going up, and downtown means numbers will go down. If you’re on 89th street, you’ll want a downtown train, if you’re going to 14th street. Got it? New York is best on foot, perhaps even without a direction in mind, and especially during the day, it’s very very safe.

Artsy Sightseeing

A trip to New York would be remiss without a visit to Central Park. Once there, you’re so close to the MoMA, The Frick, Museum of Natural History, the Guggenheim and other worthy art galleries, if you’re into that sort of thing. It’s so easy to walk in and out of Central Park, as you weave your way from gallery to gallery, and it would be a shame not to. Though it’s a bit controversial, we’d give a pass to the Whitney in the West Village, which seems to celebrate art as irony, rather than a beautiful skill. Compared to seeing a Warhol at the MoMA, it just doesn’t stack up. After you’ve completed your midtown and uptown sightseeing, grab a downtown subway train and head for the World Trade Center. Between the Oculus and the incredibly powerful 9/11 Memorial, you’ll be so glad you did. Few places on earth replicate the powerful feelings and inspiration felt as you enter the Oculus, and walking out to admire One World Trade Center from the ground up is truly spectacular. And yeah, it’s New York, seeing a Broadway play is totally ok.

Day One Plan

In the morning, head to Central Park for a casual wander and some galleries. On a beautiful day, you can spend hours weaving North, South, East and West through the park, passing through each unique nook and corner. For any Beatles fan, “Imagine” is a must visit. Grab a croissant at Maison Kayser or Bouchon Bakery and head for the MoMA. After a good few hours uptown falling in and out of the endless shops and galleries, find an inviting sidewalk cafe along Columbus or Amsterdam Avenues, before heading to Columbus Circle. From Columbus, take the A,C or E trains down to World Trade. There’s so much to see from nearby Battery Park and Wall Street, and the area is easily worth an hour, before heading to One World Trade Center and of course, the 9/11 Memorial. After a powerful afternoon, choose to walk your way up along the West Side, picking up the High Line at 14th Street. Enjoy life above the fray for a while, before doubling back and hitting Top Of The Standard for a drink, ideally with a downtown facing table to watch the sunset over One World Trade. It’ll feel special, trust us.

Shopping

People come to New York just to shop, and if you’re one of them, you won’t be disappointed. From incredible curated vintage shops in the Lower East Side and Brooklyn, to the commanding luxury brands of Madison Avenue, there’s something for everyone. If you want quirky, unique, one off shops, our advice would be to get lost in the Lower East Side, Soho and Williamsburg. Just drift around, and don’t be afraid, especially in Manhattan to wander away from the crowds. If you want department stores, H&M and all things luxury, just plant yourself anywhere in lower midtown and start walking up Madison Avenue. If you’re into cool Scandinavian design shops, curated art collections and high fashion runway stuff, the West Village, Greenwich Village and Meatpacking districts are where you can find all the stuff that’s designed to look homeless but actually caries a ridiculous price tag. A walk down Greenwich Ave will cure even the strongest of sartorial blues.

Dinner

From world famous falafel trucks to the finest of fine dining, New York has it all. If you want cheap and cheerful, Gansevoort Market offers a selection of establishments in a cool environment, with something for everyone. It’s like Chelsea Market, but a bit less commercialized. For one of the best Italian meals you’ll ever find, at a price you can stomach, Barbuto in the West Village is a staple of New York’s gastronomic scene, and sister restaurant JAMS doesn’t disappoint uptown either. If a big, classic New York steak is what you’re after, Keens Steakhouse or Peter Luger in Brooklyn are your two best bets for the real thing. For high end sushi lovers, Sushi Nakazawa is a NYC legend which might break the bank, but shouldn’t require a second mortgage. For more every day, outstanding Asian meals at reasonable prices, Thaimee Table offers top notch Thai in the East Village, Babu Ji offers a fun take on Indian street food and the venerable Shun Lee offers sophisticated Chinese. If you want an Indian treat at a higher price point, Indian Accent is off the charts. And finally, though New York might be the last place you’d expect it, you can find some of the finest barbecue (and bourbon) anywhere, at Fette Sau in Brooklyn. Still not sure? Check out this list of our favorites, which loads onto an easy map.

Drinks

There are so many ways to do drinks, and New York City offers every single one of them. From a true cocktail revolution at Attaboy in lower Manhattan, to a drink at the iconic Polo Bar at the Plaza Hotel, you just can’t go wrong. If cocktails are your thing, you’ll never be disappointed at Mace, Employees Only, NoMad Bar, Top Of The Standard, Bar Downstairs or Dead Rabbit. If you’re into wine, La Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels offers one of the finest wine programs anywhere in the world – and yes, they’re French. And if you’re into beer and sports bars, just turn a corner – you’ll find one.

Day Two

Assuming you got your shopping and cultural needs out of the way on Day 1, you can now enjoy New York City like a local. Take the train to downtown Brooklyn, DUMBO or Williamsburg and discover life just outside of the city. These neighborhoods offer refreshing takes on city life, and are straight out of the movies. With unique local flair, you’ll find great places to eat, shop and peek around. Once you’ve made your way through a nice stretch, you must do the obligatory walk back across the Bridge. Both the Brooklyn and Williamsburg Bridge offer excellent, safe walking paths and will spit you out in a cool part of New York City. Now it’s time to walk. Wander around, find a nice corner slice of pizza, grab a great coffee and let the city come to you. There’s no better way to spend your last day in NYC than just wandering, and watching neighborhoods change as you continue to move. If you’ve got time, find your way to Bryant Park or any of the other casual squares around the city for a relaxing end to a perfect trip! Oh, and be sure to leave plenty of time to get to the airport!

What’s your favorite thing to do in New York City?