As we’ve covered, there are quite a few ways to book and plan great tours. The main issue tourists face- is that tour operators want you to book in advance, and many of the best sights around the world are only magic during great weather. When it comes to Mt. Fuji, there are a few key thoughts to make sure you actually see the very best of the mountain…

On Cloudy Days You Can’t See The Peak…

Though booking early has it’s advantages, it’s often the last minute (or week) planner that has the best Fuji experience. Through a hotel concierge it’s almost always possible to book a tour as late as the night before a tour, thus allowing travelers to check out the weather forecast, and current condition at the peak before dropping some substantial change. You don’t want to go if you can’t see it, right?

Fuji Is Only Covered In Snow During Certain Seasons…

A vast majority of iconic Mt. Fuji photos feature the trademark snow capped peak. Though an active volcano is always cool, and the mountain looks literally stunning in all seasons, this is an important tidbit to note, since you’d be extremely lucky to get a pic with a snowcap during any other season. October to early March you’ll find the greatest visibility and the most powdery snow gracing your photos. 

During Some Seasons, You Can Actually Climb The Mountain, If You’re Into That…

During summer months, adventurers can actually climb the mountain, in addition to any standard tours. If reaching the summit of Japan’s largest mountain seems like an epic tick off the bucket list, you’ll want to visit somewhere near July and August, which are the official climbing months. Much earlier or later and you may not be allowed to climb, due to inclement weather. 

You Don’t Want To Miss The Chureito Pagoda, Especially During Cherry Blossom Season… 

Yes, this is where just about all the epic photos that grace magazine covers come from. The Chureito Pagoda is a timeless piece of Japanese architecture and tradition, and a part of the Arakura Sengen Shrine.  The five story pagoda just happens to offer unobstructed views of Mt Fuji, minus the gorgeous cherry blossoms, which you can tastefully lens blur in your photos. Cherry Blossom season changes every year, but you’ll do best to plan for very late March through April for the best chances. 

And For A Strangely Unique Fuji Experience, Check Out The Shibazakura Festival…

It may not be quite as magnificent as the annual cherry blossom tradition, but the Shibazakura festival, which features a hard to believe bloom of colorful pink, yellow, red and purple flowers set amongst one of Fuji’s five lakes offers some very instagram worthy snaps of the legendary mountain, with some very colorful contrast. You just have to see it to believe it.